NatWest taps Open Banking for cardless online payments

NatWest taps Open Banking for cardless online payments

NatWest has teamed up with the Carphone Warehouse to trial an online shopping system that lets customers ditch their debit and credit cards and pay directly through their bank account.

According to the Press Association, when checking out on the Carphone Warehouse site, shoppers are presented with a NatWest button that they can press to be taken to the bank's app, where they log in and complete the payment.

NatWest says that the pilot has proven a big hit with customers, cutting purchase times and ensuring that bank balances are immediately accurate. Meanwhile, retailers like Carphone Warehouse benefit from lower processing fees and bank-grade security.

NatWest plans to carry out more trials with other businesses in the coming months and, because the system harnesses the UK's new Open Banking regime, could eventually offer it to customers of other banks.

Dean Wallace, practice lead, at ACI Worldwide, says: "NatWest is the first UK bank to launch a truly innovative payments service, leveraging Open Banking compliant APIs and its direct connection to the UK’s Faster Payments Service.

Adds Wallace: "Adds Wallace: "The core concept at play here is globally referred to as ‘Request for Payment’ - not to be confused with FPSL’s Request To Pay service which is not yet launched - where the person or entity that wants to be paid for goods or services asks to be paid via a trusted third party who then routes the payment request to the consumer’s bank.

"The bank then uses a secure mobile app to present the ‘Request to Pay’ to the consumer so they can choose an account, check the balance, and make the payment."

Comments: (11)

Paul Love
Paul Love - Open Payments Cloud - Nottingham 12 June, 2018, 16:191 like 1 like

Well done Dean,

Looks like you are building the de-facto standards for request-to-pay!

David Parker
David Parker - polymath consulting - Woking 12 June, 2018, 16:471 like 1 like

great to see the start of merchant adoption of PSD2 open banking pay by bank.  Exactly what Konsentus is set up to help with in terms of managing TPP regulatory approval.

Bo Harald
Bo Harald - ZEF, Transmeri, Demos, Real Time Economy Program, - Helsinki Region 12 June, 2018, 17:55Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Implemented in Finland in the 90s - now dominating. But does not guarantee delivery - so in cases like risky airlines a credit card is better.

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 13 June, 2018, 08:40Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Can I please ask why a credit card is better in case of airlines? How do you mean 'risky' airlines? Does the Finland system have a particular name? Why did banks go ahead with it in Finland? (Interchange fee issues?) Thanks for any answers.

Bo Harald
Bo Harald - ZEF, Transmeri, Demos, Real Time Economy Program, - Helsinki Region 13 June, 2018, 08:451 like 1 like

If the airline goes bankrupt you get your money back from the card issuer. The e-payment anno -96 is simply called e-payment. At the time it was introduced there was a lot of efforts to make card payments more secure - and the marketing for this managed to scare customers - so a familiar bill payment like e-payment was needed for e-commerce.

 

 

Varun Yadav
Varun Yadav - BNYM - London 13 June, 2018, 08:51Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes This option has been around in India in the form of "net banking" since over a decade. There aren't any significant advantages for the customer though, as (1) they need to remember/enter their username/password; (2) unlike card transactions it isn't possible to store card details with merchant and make the transactions actually quick (imagine carrying out a purchase at amazon where you have to enter your banking credentials everytime); (3) as Bo stated above, chargebacks and dispute resolutions are easier and safer with card transactions.
Ketharaman Swaminathan
Ketharaman Swaminathan - GTM360 Marketing Solutions - Pune 13 June, 2018, 11:58Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Why would I want to ditch my credit card? Maybe it's only me but this has the makings of becoming yet another solution looking for a problem. In any case, Bank Transfer mode of payment has been around for ages in India. Memory serves, it was also going to be launched by EBA Clearing nearly 10 years ago in Europe. My post on this topic is dated 2011. And that post began with a declaration that it was not innovative.

How is this "truly innovative"?

Bo Harald
Bo Harald - ZEF, Transmeri, Demos, Real Time Economy Program, - Helsinki Region 13 June, 2018, 12:15Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Customers prefer it and merchants save costs and get the money in real time.

Paul Butterworth
Paul Butterworth - Trustonic - Cambridge 14 June, 2018, 09:08Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Let's hope they secured this better than they secured customers credit cards! That data breach they just announced was rather frightening.

Bo Harald
Bo Harald - ZEF, Transmeri, Demos, Real Time Economy Program, - Helsinki Region 14 June, 2018, 17:22Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Let us hope so - but the Finnish e-payment model is as secure as a bill payment - and this has been running in e-banking since 1979 - without problems. The only problem here is that it is not a 4-corner model - and the merchant has to sign up with several banks - but then there are not that many in a small country..

 

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 15 June, 2018, 16:18Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

"login and complete the payment" - this clearly doesn't sound like an implementation of Open Banking / PSD2 in any shape or form if the customer is still required to login themselves. Good attemp to make it sound cool!

Featured Job
All Jobs »