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'I slept with Keira Knightley'

Such an event is, probably, an example of what one would brag about - in public or within a close circle - rather than keep secret, unless you are married with kids and don't want to come across as unfaithful and untrustworthy. (My choice of the "target" was inspired by Jeremy Clarkson who regularly refers to KK when talking about cars).

What is a secret when it comes to information we voluntarily provide about ourselves? Does privacy really matter?  

I can understand why secrecy is extremely important when it comes to business; even then the downside of exposure can, in most cases, be contained. What is the worst outcome of "secret" private information being obtained by the government?.. After all, neither WikiLeaks nor Snowden shuttered the world we live in.

One example of misuse of collected private data is an unauthorised access to it by third parties for malicious purposes, e.g. blackmail. However, if I am a determined and well-funded individual or a company, I can find a way to get almost any info on almost anybody - it's just a matter of price these days...

If we cannot hide, perhaps, we should follow Bob Knight's advice. I.e. get over and used to the fact that we are being tracked 24/7 via all the communication channels, and just carry on with our lives as usual. There are many much more important and lasting things in this life than someone's dirty linen.

In a debate about personal privacy (famous) FAKEGRIMLOCK expressed the same "live with it" point of view as I did above. There was also one person who suggested that my "if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear" argument has been often used by... despots. I bet he clicks on the "I agree" button without reading  the small print of T&Cs which, almost without exception, are full of "despotism".

What is your view on privacy and Big Brother?

Comments: (7)

Brett King
Brett King - Moven - New York 06 September, 2013, 14:43Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

So did you or didn't you!? :)

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 06 September, 2013, 14:52Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

The answer is in the title... ;)

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 06 September, 2013, 16:08Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Well, if that headline doesn't generate pageviews, I don't know what will.

Incidentally, I saw the dreadfully tedious "London Boulevard" at the cinema. It's fair to say that the entire audience slept with Keira Knightly. Zzz....

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 06 September, 2013, 16:11Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Yes, it's funny what makes the headlines these days... (Google "Keira Knightley")

Salil Ravindran
Salil Ravindran - Oracle - Bangalore 09 September, 2013, 14:28Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Lot of things around privacy for sure but couldnt help 'peep' in when this finextra mail alert came in! :-)

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 09 September, 2013, 14:35Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Perhaps we should elect KK as the ambassador for mobile payments... To stimulate the interest in the subject among the general public.

Gregg Weintraub
Gregg Weintraub - State Street IMS - Princeton 09 September, 2013, 16:48Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

A good point is being made here that we can get overly concerned regarding oversight of our activities which are for seemingly valid reasons.  There is also the historical parable of not standing up for your neighbor when the government came for...and then no one was there to stand up for me.  The problem here is one of slowly boiling a frog, at what point is this surrender of privacy a recognizable danger to the individual.  There may not be enough computing power or time and resource today to pay attention to the petty offenses recorded.  But when the pwer comes (Moore's law tells me it will) and the criteria have changed, will your past be held against you.  That is the hidden danger in the approach. 

Mind you I don't think that the processes in place can or will be stopped.  I think we may need to be more active in legislating appropriate use of our electronic history and transparancy in how it is used.

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This post is from a series of posts in the group:

Innovation in Financial Services

A discussion of trends in innovation management within financial institutions, and the key processes, technology and cultural shifts driving innovation.


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