Dutch banks team up on digital identity service pilot

Dutch banks team up on digital identity service pilot

Dutch banks are banding together on a digital identification service which will let online customers use their login details to access other commercial and government sites.

The banks, through the Dutch Payments Association, are working on a pilot which will go live next year and let participating customers use their online banking identity to access services from the Dutch tax authority and an insurance company. No banking details such as account balance or payment details are exchanged, stresses the Association.

Participants will have to give their express consent to their bank to hand over personal information and each partner organisation may get different information. "So the bank can ask for approval on behalf of one company for the transmission of the name and address of the client and on behalf of another company for a simple age check," says a statement.

The Dutch Payment Association says that ultimately the service will mean consumers will only need to use one identification method, which is both easier to remember and more secure than the current raft of usernames and passwords required by different online providers.

Meanwhile, for merchants, the system means that users do not need to sign up when they first visit a site, boosting conversion rates. In addition, the cost of customer due diligence and credit risk assessment is slashed because of the high level of confidence in using online identities verified by banks.

The banks benefit from being more useful to their customers and the chance to expand their existing identification and authentication services.

Comments: (12)

Bo Harald
Bo Harald - ZEF, Transmeri, Demos, Real Time Economy Program, - Helsinki Region 02 November, 2015, 19:211 like 1 like

Bravo - this - the most natural thing - has been a great success story in Finland - and later in other Nordics

Conny Dorrestijn
Conny Dorrestijn - BankiFi - Manchester 03 November, 2015, 11:03Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Great news - is this building on the existing and supported QiY platform, business and legal framework?

Vineet Anand
Vineet Anand - Aumtech iSolutions Ltd - San Francisco 03 November, 2015, 13:46Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

@Bo - this seems to be a leap forward of PSD2 directive which will have banks create API's for AISP's and PISP's. Digital identity will be an extension similar to Paypal and Barclays accounts as credentials in UK for govt. websites?

Ketharaman Swaminathan
Ketharaman Swaminathan - GTM360 Marketing Solutions - Pune 03 November, 2015, 15:15Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Why is this any better than using social media login, which is already quite widespread? In the event of loss of money from bank account, will bank indemnify customer or tell customer to go follow up with each and every website into which they logged in via their bank creds?

Bo Harald
Bo Harald - ZEF, Transmeri, Demos, Real Time Economy Program, - Helsinki Region 03 November, 2015, 18:31Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Social media credentials cannot be used for bank transactions and in public sector services where similar strong e-id is needed.

Ketharaman Swaminathan
Ketharaman Swaminathan - GTM360 Marketing Solutions - Pune 04 November, 2015, 07:14Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

I wasn't proposing social media login for banking. The moment you allow that government services require stronger ID, you leave yourselves open for different parts of the government to assert the same thing for themselves and disparate e-ID systems are the inevitable result. For example, my government electricity supplier lets me know my bill amount and pay my bill with very weak ID. Whereas my Income Tax Department requires my company to use USB token based digital signature in order to file my corporate tax return. How can these two government entities accept a single e-identity service, whether provided by bank or anybody else? The problem is exacerbated many times over in countries with a federal structure of government where state governments are fairly autonomous e.g. Germany, India, USA.

Bo Harald
Bo Harald - ZEF, Transmeri, Demos, Real Time Economy Program, - Helsinki Region 04 November, 2015, 07:30Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Banks have done 3rd party e-id since the 90s - no problem for governments. Federal or not. All the way to municipalities. And of course for similar needs in the private sector. And not only e-id - also signing contracts etc. In private and employee roles.

 

Roger Storm
Roger Storm - SIX Group /SIX x-clear - Zürich 04 November, 2015, 08:421 like 1 like

Indeed, as BH says eIDs were for example rolled out in Sweden in 2002-03 and have been instrumental to the success for various forms of electronic agreement conclusions. It's been key to dititalized processes in many areas and on many levels: for tax reporting, VAT-reporting, banking services, car registrations, insurance. The technology and know-how and good examples are out there. Great to see the Netherlands joining this, and this is key also to for example instant payments services ... but there ought to be more countries?

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 06 November, 2015, 11:441 like 1 like

This is indeed a very good development where banks can leverage some of their main assest, their customer database, their secure infrastructure and their channels. It will be interesting to see what else is possible with this combination of public and private cooperation

Bo Harald
Bo Harald - ZEF, Transmeri, Demos, Real Time Economy Program, - Helsinki Region 07 November, 2015, 15:24Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

I can think of a big number of things that can be done - in a secure and very userfriendly way (learn once - use everywhere = economy of repetition, economy of reuse, economy of trust - even economy of scale and scope...... all the huge levers in place). Things to do in 3rd party services or from e-bank services directly with single sign-on! :1. signing contracts (also at work - you do use many personal tools anyway...), 2. empowering others, 3. e-wills, 4. voting, 5. sending invitations (using e-invoicing addresses), 6. accepting proposals (mobile press A for paying e-invoice on due date happens in strongly authtenticated space!!  etc

 

Bo Harald
Bo Harald - ZEF, Transmeri, Demos, Real Time Economy Program, - Helsinki Region 07 November, 2015, 15:27Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

More from Finland:  http://www.finextra.com/blogs/fullblog.aspx?blogid=11447

Bo Harald
Bo Harald - ZEF, Transmeri, Demos, Real Time Economy Program, - Helsinki Region 07 November, 2015, 15:28Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Might as well copy-paste text: 

e-banking customers in Finland used their e-banking passwords 56,2 million times to log in to public sector and other non-banking services last year.  Up from 47,1m.

Finland is a small country - so it may be useful to multiply into a corresponding EU-potential = 4 billion times. 

Does this save tax payers' money? Does it save citizens nerves? Oh yeah.. Is it secure? Naturally - it has to be - otherwise banking would not function. Other countries are followin suite - but it could happen faster.

Why not? Do banks not see this as their responsibility (and modest business case). Do politicians not take their responsibility - making it easy and cost-efficient?

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