16 December 2017
Robert Siciliano

Identity Theft Expert

Robert Siciliano - IDTheftSecurity.com

739Posts 2,050,698Views 62Comments

Consumers sacrificing Privacy for Convenience

06 May 2015  |  9736 views  |  0

It’s hard to believe that, according to a recent poll from the Pew Research Center, most Americans aren’t too upset that the government can track their e-mails and phone calls. There’s too much of a blasé attitude, it seems, with people thinking, “I don’t care if I’m monitored; I have nothing to hide.”

This blows it for those of us who actually DO mind that the government is snooping around in our communications, even if we’re as innocent as a butterfly.

Privacy experts believe that governmental monitoring of online activities is just such a fixed part of Americans’ lives that we’ve come to accept it. But privacy experts are pushing for an increased awareness of the importance of digital privacy, and this begins with the U.S. masses putting out some demands for privacy.

An article on arcamax.com points out that as long as Americans are sitting pretty with cheap and easy-to-use Internet experiences, nothing much will change. “People are very willing to sacrifice privacy for convenience,” states Aaron Deacon, as quoted in the article. He manages a group that explores issues pertaining to Internet use.

The article says that Pew’s research reveals that since the NSA revelation, 20 percent of Americans have become more privacy-conscious in a variety of easy ways like using a private web browser.

But most Americans shy away from the more complicated privacy protection methods. Furthermore, some people don’t even know of the extent of governmental monitoring.

Nevertheless, ease of use has made people complacent. Who wants to hassle around with encryption, decoding, coding, etc.? This stuff is great for techy people but not the average user.

The good news is that there is somewhat of a revolution geared towards making privacy methods less intimidating to Joe and Jane User. It just won’t happen overnight, but the market is “emerging,” says Deacon in the article.

Theoretically, if everyone turned techy overnight or privacy protection instantly became as easy as two plus two, this would make unhappy campers out of the businesses that flourish from tracking users’ online habits. The government wouldn’t be smiling, either, as it always wants to have fast access (e.g., “backdoor”) to electronic communications: the first communication choice of terrorists.

Thus far it seems that people have two choices: a fast, easy, cheap Internet experience that gives up privacy, or a techy, expensive, confusing experience that ensures privacy. The first choice is currently winning by miles.

Forewarned is forearmed. Pay attention. This is getting real.

a member-uploaded image TagsSecurity

Comments: (0)

Comment on this story (membership required)

Latest posts from Robert

What Was Scary About Blackhat 2017?

02 August 2017  |  6230 views  |  0 comments | recomends Recommends 0 TagsSecurity

Black Hat 2017 was an Amazing Event

29 July 2017  |  6805 views  |  0 comments | recomends Recommends 0 TagsSecurity

Blackhat Hackers Love Office Printers

28 July 2017  |  5411 views  |  0 comments | recomends Recommends 0 TagsSecurity

Getting Owned or Pwned SUCKS!

13 June 2017  |  5785 views  |  0 comments | recomends Recommends 0 TagsSecurity

Parents Beware of Finstagram

27 April 2017  |  5249 views  |  0 comments | recomends Recommends 0 TagsSecurity

Robert's profile

job title Security Analyst
location Boston
member since 2010
Summary profile See full profile »
Security analyst, published author, television news correspondent. Deliver presentations throughout the United States, Canada and internationally on identity theft protection and personal security....

Robert's expertise

Member since 2009
732 posts62 comments

Who's commenting on Robert's posts

Ketharaman Swaminathan