Former Westpac exec fights fraudsters with Da Vinci card

Former Westpac exec fights fraudsters with Da Vinci card

A former senior security executive at Westpac has founded a firm that lets people put all of their cards on a single piece of plastic that generates one-time PINs for transactions.

Called ScramCard, the UK startup lets users link up to eight cards, online or via an app, to their Da Vinci Choice Mastercard, which has an e-ink display, touch numerical keypad and battery.

When they want to make a payment in-store or make an ATM withdrawal, users press a button to pick which card they want, then press the POS button and enter the Da Vinci card's PIN, which generates a one-time code that is entered into the terminal.

The card also supports contactless, requiring users to press a tap and pay button and enter their Da Vinci code before a transaction. Meanwhile, for online and telephone purchases, the card generates a one-time expiry date and CVV number.



The brainchild of former Westpac chief security officer Hewitt, ScramCard is inviting Brits to register interest in the £75 Da Vinci card ahead of its planned arrival early next year.

Says Hewitt: "Right now, the industry is stopping two-thirds of card fraud, but criminals still made off with nearly £300m in the first half of 2017. It’s beyond time that we stop it all. This is our vision.

"I’ve seen first-hand how easily people fall victim to fraud, and even if the money is returned, it’s a huge hassle and leaves people in the lurch with their personal finances. Our proposition is simple; work with us to cut financial fraud out of your wallet."

Comments: (9)

Abimbola Oloyede
Abimbola Oloyede - UNITED BANK FOR AFRICA - Lagos 10 October, 2017, 06:36Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

This is very interesting, i am very happy about it and i hope we will be able to cut down fraud to the bearest minimum. Kudos guys.

Rajesh Tiwari
Rajesh Tiwari - Wipro Ltd - London 10 October, 2017, 10:42Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Indeed a great move, less burden on my wallet and on my mind too. I dont need to carry many cards and remember various pin/passwords. Isnt it on the pattern to PSD2? Finally we are moving from many options to one great option. 

But a great thumbs up for the initiative. 

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 10 October, 2017, 10:47Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

I agree. A very interesting proposition, though £75 seems a bit steep and is that an annual fee or just a one off registration? How long before other (major) banks start to follow?

Michael Fuller
Michael Fuller - None - London 10 October, 2017, 12:162 likes 2 likes

Interesting but why as a consumer should I pay £75 to fix the underlying insecurity of allowing card not present transactions? I'm not liable for fraud (unless grossly negligent) so what is the benefit I get for my £75?

A better solution would be for the card networks to ban card not present and offer a truly secure way to buy goods online that doesn't rely on card details.

Jan-Olof Brunila
Jan-Olof Brunila - Swedbank - Stockholm 10 October, 2017, 15:041 like 1 like

The requirement that more than one billion e-comm shoppers should get a new device in order to stop cardfraud they are not liable to pay for, makes it unlikely to become a global standard. Furthermore the PSD2 now sets up requirements for strong two factor or biometric auth for all electronic payments + dynamic linking for e comm payments and this will be the main objective to meet in Europe.

Ketharaman Swaminathan
Ketharaman Swaminathan - GTM360 Marketing Solutions - Pune 10 October, 2017, 17:57Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

There are at least 3 similar products that failed to go mainstream in the US. In my blog post Coin Solves A Pain. But Is It A 100 Dollar Pain?, I'd done a quick "cost-benefit analysis" of COIN, the pioneer in this product category. An overwhelming majority of readers who took the survey on my blog post said they'd pay not more than US$ 10 for it. Good luck to Da Vinci card with its £75 price tag.

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 11 October, 2017, 21:32Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

"When they want to make a payment in-store or make an ATM withdrawal, users press a button to pick which card they want, then press the POS button and enter the Da Vinci card's PIN, which generates a one-time code that is entered into the terminal." Seriously?!.

Ketharaman Swaminathan
Ketharaman Swaminathan - GTM360 Marketing Solutions - Pune 12 October, 2017, 11:47Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

@AlexanderPeschkoff:

LOL but stranger things have happened viz. "Reach checkout; enter PIN to get past lockscreen; locate mobile wallet app; locate card; scan QR code; blah blah blah". Mobile wallet simply won't work in a supermarket where there's a long queue. But the last year's re/demonetization in India provided a good learning opportunity: Most other types of stores - e.g. apparel stores, bookstores, mom-and-pop stores - don't have such a long queue at checkout. Despite the fact that a mobile wallet entails a longer-drawn out process compared to cash / plastic card, I think it's still quite usable at many stores.

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 12 October, 2017, 11:511 like 1 like

@KS - Some UX flows are "non-traditional", but they work because they either solve a pressing problem, or are better than the existing one. Ideally - both. Not in that case, unfortunately. 

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