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Credit card crooks steal £14k from Katie Price

06 October 2011  |  6101 views  |  1 credit card

Credit card fraudsters have stolen around £14,000 from professional 'personality' Katie Price, according to the Daily Mirror.

The former glamour model, also known as Jordan, saw three credit cards rejected at the checkout on a shopping trip in Brighton at the weekend.

On calling her bank branch manager, Price discovered that her cards had been cancelled 24 hours previously by an impersonator, a "source close to the star" told the Mirror.

When she asked about her balance it emerged that an unauthorised withdrawal of £9000 and two of £2500 had been made.

The crooks also ordered items online, giving Price's real address for billing but a delivery address in the north.

HSBC called in Lincolnshire police who have already "located footage from CCTV footage showing someone dressing up as Kate with a blonde wig and big boobs, clearly impersonating her," says the source.

"It's really horrible. All I know is that police have footage of these people pretending to be me - I don't even know if it is a man or a woman. Obviously my ego hopes it was, at least, a female impostor," Price told the tabloid.

Katie Price victim of bank fraud by Jordan impersonator - Daily Mirror

KeywordsCARD FRAUD

Comments: (1)

Jan-Olof Brunila
Jan-Olof Brunila - Swedbank - Stockholm | 07 October, 2011, 07:22

As long as we banks allow card schemes to process purchases to card accounts that have been made by keying in card numbers and not use any cardholder verification methods, we will encounter these fraud transactions. A friend of mine working in the security area of a bank once told me that:  "Since the card schemes allow e commerce transactions to take place without any other controls than the card number details visible on the card - why do we bother with atm:s with pinpads, end-to-end encryption, real time checking, video cameras and other measures. If we banks would treat atm withdrawals with the same relaxed attitude as card schemes do regarding e commerce payments, we could place a barrel full of cash outside the bank branch and attach a pack of withdrawal forms on a nail next to the barrel. Customers could pick up the needed cash and fill in their card number on the form and drop it into the barrel. Bank staff can then record the transactions to respective deposit acconts.In the event of a disputed withdrawal the bank branch would carry the liability... - imagine how much money we would save in technical and security measures investments and how wide access we could afford to offer!" This was in 1999. The e commerce purchases are still seeking for secure and convenient solutions.

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