21 October 2017

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Retired Member

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Comments: (3)

A Finextra member
A Finextra member | 04 February, 2010, 08:18

Problem is IE is tied into the Windows OS and it’s just not possible to completely expunge it.  So for an IT dept it means maintaining two browser deployments, should, for example, the Firefox option be progressed.  Another approach is to continue with IE and ensure the correct use and timely update of security tools...

Everyone has view; I'm personally more comfortable with IE8 security wise than prior versions.   However, browsing risks are not going to be eliminated on the Windows platform whichever client browser is selected.

 

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A Finextra member
A Finextra member | 04 February, 2010, 10:19

That's true, Robert. However, as I've pointed out in some as my previous blogs such as this one, it's not just about security. IE performance (including IE8) is abysmal compared to other browsers and this means that banks are getting left behind in the use of the Web for delivering high-performance applications.

It may not be possible to "completely expunge" IE, as you say, but it's certainly easy to permanently disable it when installing a newer browser. Surely this is sufficient.

 

 

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Peter J Cooper
Peter J Cooper - Cooper Sydney - Sydney | 04 February, 2010, 22:46

Speed and ease of use are so closely intertwined in these time-poor days of ours. In some of our sites (customers and investments) IE (all versions) are down to less than 40% of the total traffic.

Google is certainly not the first business site to stop supporting IE6. 

It is rapidly showing who the old world clients are and it goes to total experience in other configuration areas - old smaller screens for example.

The question is rapidly becoming if you have an old version or old equipment how likely is it that we even want you as a customer? If you can't upgrade each 3+ years you probably aren't going to be very profitable.

I know this sounds harsh and lots of macs in particular last a lot longer in terms of practical usefulness due to their auto-upgrade features and more progressive architecture.

This is the reality of our new world, once we allow for mobile almost every site must support 3 or 4 browser types (plus multiple current versions) to be used by most mainstream consumers. So in practical terms the number is more like 8 to 10 minimum. Happy to send screen shots of sample site analytics showing breakdown if anyone wants more.

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