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Uber now runs on blockchain

Using a decentralised blockchain architecture based on the advanced Chandra–Toueg consensus algorithm, Uber can now cut through the Byzantine complexity of booking a ride by connecting drivers and passengers directly via instant P2P protocol. There are immediate plans to introduce Uber coin that will allow to slash payment costs in half whilst greatly increasing profit margin through the unpredictable volatility of coin price enhanced by the existing Surge mechanism. Blah-blah-blah… (I've made that up, of course - in case you were wondering.)

If Uber (or a bank) were to switch to a blockchain architecture tomorrow, would we even notice?.. If Uber could use blockchain to reduce payment costs, would passengers pay less or drivers earn more?..

The vast majority of blockchain hammers out there are searching for a nail, any nail. Fractional Uber fleet tokenization anyone?.. It’s a big market. Huge!

“You've got to start with the customer experience and work backwards to the technology. You can't start with the technology and try to figure out where can I sell it.” 

It was Steve Jobs who said that. Let’s listen to those words of wisdom. There is nothing wrong, for example, with the Uber's current centralised architecture based on a plain-vanilla database that fullfilled 10 billion rides.

Blockchain does have its advantages (as well as limitations), but it's not a silver bullet. Nothing is. It's horses for courses.

 

Ditto.
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Comments: (2)

Matt Scott
Matt Scott - Fiserv Inc - London 25 September, 2018, 12:44Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

There is a lot of technology kicking around for people to try and find business solutions for.  It's often easier to indentify the business problem and find an appropriate technology solution rather than the other way around.

Ketharaman Swaminathan
Ketharaman Swaminathan - GTM360 Marketing Solutions - Pune 25 September, 2018, 19:40Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

Mostly agree for B2B technology. Agree partially for B2C technologies such as AirBnB, Netflix, et al. But it's hard to appreciate what business problems were solved by blockbuster B2C technologies like Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, Uber et al. Although, in all cases, technology must always be packaged - though not necessarily created - to solve a pain or provide a gain.