Blog article
See all stories »

'User friendly' does not compute with mobile makers

Anyone ever had any difficulty transferring contacts from one phone to the next? Does 10 days to get your new Blackberry working and synchronised with your enterprise email system, and getting your old phone contacts into the new phone sound familiar to anyone?

Has anyone resorted to simply typing them in?

While I use Nokia/Blackberry without the Blackberry bit, I have recently experienced attempting to connect to the enterprise and get the contacts from another brand of phone into a Blackberry 8100. What a hoohaa.

While being equipped with blue-tooth, and every other type of connectivity, you might suggest the obvious - simply copy them to the SIM, swap phones and copy the address from the SIM into the new phone.

Yeah right. The SIM does not hold all the data fields that were in the phoneA address book, and phoneA doesn't talk to phoneB properly. The names may come out shortened and the address and secondary numbers may disappear altogether. The only recourse was to send them via blue-tooth one at a time to the laptop and then sync them up automatically. Well that's useless - especially when the phone defaults to sending it to the Outlook Express address book on the laptop (I've never even used that) and not the Outlook/Exchange address book. Simple just import them. NOT so simple. Try it.

I approach these types of issues, not as an IT guru, but as an average user and refuse to resort to higher skills or lateral thinking to carry out any task on a consumer device. If it is not easy and intuitive - then throw it away immediately (or ask for a refund).

Anyone else have any trouble with these new wonder devices?

All I can ask is who are the idiots designing these things and have they forgotten they're supposed to be designing for idiots too? Do they think we've all got nothing better to do than read a misleading 95 page manual or whatever? Get real.

I foresee the emergence of secure address book and mail providers who'll automatically swap/restore all your stuff over automatically when you either throw out, lose or just get sick of the latest fad mobile device you carry.

Perhaps it's an idea for RIM? Set up a service for Blackberry buyers which brings all your data into your new Blackberry for you.

It's certainly an argument for simplicity. I suspect that we're all better off anyway without our 'instant mail' on our phones and go back to checking our email the old way - when we actually feel like - or have time to read it. The alternative is for someone to actually call you and talk to you if it's really all that urgent.

 

5315

Comments: (6)

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 18 July, 2008, 12:01Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

I never quite got my old Samsung phone to sync with Windows. It came with the software from hell. When I got a Mac it worked - to my surprise.

Then when I got the iPhone I could just sync my address book to it. It was a genuine shock to have something just work - so I know what you mean! 

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 21 July, 2008, 09:28Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

...which is why Apple is likely to walk all over RIM over the coming year.

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 21 July, 2008, 09:54Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes Apple will find it easier if they get the glitches out of the new software. It seems I'm not the only one who has noticed the iPhone now grinds to a halt - either when entering text or scrolling through contacts. It verges on unusable at the moment - intermittently.
A Finextra member
A Finextra member 22 July, 2008, 13:51Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

I must say this is where Apple has got it right for years. Transfering my old contacts from my Sony Ericsson T610 (found in my drawer) to my mac via bluetooth was simple. Probably because no mobile vendor software was required. Synching them to my iPhone was done automatically (again, probably because no mobile vendor software was required. I think there is a computing law that states the further removed a company is from making the hardware is directly proportional to the quality of the resulting software and user experience.

A Finextra member
A Finextra member 23 July, 2008, 14:50Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

To be fair, I'd always expect it to be easy switching from one model to another by the same manufacturer, but I think it might be a good idea to make the switching experience to your brand as good as possible, if you want customers to do so.

When we get a new device we tend to show it off, best to have your new customers do so smiling rather than complaining about the difficulty.

I wouldn't have guessed resetting the  Blackberry would stop it from receiving SMS, either, or that I'd still be able to send them. That was certainly confusing.

It's not rocket science to expect your new customers to want to get the stuff out of their old phone and into their new one.  Make it easy.

It isn't uncommon to have a 'back-up' phone in the drawer or a 'going out' phone and it would be nice to keep it vaguely sync'd up with the main phone. It may be more of a service offering for a mobile provider rather than a manufactuturer, but I'm more likely to get warm fuzzies about my phone brand if they make life easier, after all - that's why I bought their phone.

David Birch
David Birch - Tomorrow's Transactions - London 23 July, 2008, 18:41Be the first to give this comment the thumbs up 0 likes

"Does 10 days to get your new Blackberry working and synchronised with your enterprise email system, and getting your old phone contacts into the new phone sound familiar to anyone?"

 

Yes.  That's why I got an iPhone.  Even Microsoft Exchange only took 3 minutes to set up.

Retired Member

Member since

19 Mar 2009

Location

Blog posts

6,023

Comments

6,224

This post is from a series of posts in the group:

Whatever...

A place to share stuff that isn't at all fintec related but is amusing, absurd or scary.


See all