22 May 2015

Identity Theft Expert

Robert Siciliano - IDTheftSecurity.com

590Posts 1,485,230Views 60Comments

Beware of Flight MH17 Facebook Scams

23 July 2014  |  865 views  |  0

How low can scammers go? The latest is phony Facebook profiles that use identities of deceased victims of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17—claiming their credit cards were stolen from the crash debris.

 

“Death hunters,” says Ukrainian MP Anton Gerashchenko on his Facebook page, are collecting jewels, cash and credit cards off of the victims. His post urges victims’ relatives to “freeze their credit cards, so that they won’t lose their assets to terrorists!”

The Dutch Banking Association assured next-of-kin that they’d be compensated for the fallout of credit card theft.

Journalist Phil Williams was at the crash site and pointed out that it was obvious that wallets and handbags had been stolen. Just about all the handbags had been opened, he reports. Looting is apparent, he says.

Mark Rutte, the Dutch Prime Minister, used the term “utterly disgusting” to describe how the rebels had treated the corpses.

But beyond the site is even more alarming activity: fake Facebook accounts. At least five phony FB accounts have been set up in the names of deceased Australians—including three kids. Facebook has since shut down the pages.

The pages provided a link to a video claiming to reveal footage of the airliner’s crash. However, users instead were directed to a website full of pop-up ads for fishy-looking services. The lure to this site was a malicious link tagline: "Video Camera Caught the moment plane MH17 Crashed over Ukraine. Watch here the video of Crash."

You can imagine how many people—not necessarily next-of-kin, took the bait and made the click. Though these particular fraudulent pages were closed down, this doesn’t mean more won’t appear.

Is this common after a disaster?

It seems to be more common, as criminals are capitalizing on current events to perpetrate scams generally within a 24-48 hour period. 

Tips for spotting these scams for consumers in general:

Thinking before you click, doing research and not being so impulsive will keep consumers from being baited by scammy links, titles and stories. 

Tips for family members of the deceased:

They should cancel credit cards, create fraud alerts through their country’s credit bureaus, and once death certificates are obtained they need to submit them to the credit bureaus. Otherwise set up Google alerts with the decedents’’ names to monitor any chatter on social sites that may turn up their likeness in a stolen social media identity theft case. 

 

TagsSecurity

Comments: (0)

Comment on this story (membership required)
Log in to receive notifications when someone posts a comment

Latest posts from Robert

3 Ways Criminals influence to steal

3 hours ago  |  278 views  |  0  |  Recommends 0 TagsSecurity

Tax Return Basics: What You must know!

16 May 2015  |  2635 views  |  0  |  Recommends 0 TagsSecurity

Time to check your Facebook Privacy settings

14 May 2015  |  2608 views  |  0  |  Recommends 0 TagsSecurity

How Hackers use LinkedIn to Scam

13 May 2015  |  6230 views  |  1  |  Recommends 0 TagsSecurity

How Employers or Parents Spy

12 May 2015  |  2151 views  |  0  |  Recommends 0 TagsSecurity

Robert's profile

job title Security Analyst
location Boston
member since 2010
Summary profile See full profile »
Security analyst, published author, television news correspondent. Deliver presentations throughout the United States, Canada and internationally on identity theft protection and personal security....

Robert's expertise

Who's commenting on Robert's posts

Ketharaman Swaminathan
Bjorn Soland
Prasenjit Das
John Serocold
Charmaine Oak
Iain Montgomery
Otmane EL RHAZI
Boris Taratine
Michael Rosenstein
Fred Pyziak
Matt Scott